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On Donations: How Giving Is Good for Your Health?
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On Donations: How Giving Is Good for Your Health?

Donating is a great practice that benefits us all. However, we tend to hold on to our possessions as if they’re too precious to give away. Beyond closing us off from those in need, not donating means we also miss many health benefits. Read on to find out how giving donations is good for your health.

Why Donating Is Important

Donations are important because not everyone can afford the things that you can. According to World Vision, over “1.3 billion people in developing countries—22 percent of the world’s population—live in multidimensional poverty.”

Multidimensional poverty is when you experience disadvantages in numerous areas, not just economically. You can be lower class, have less of an opportunity for adequate education, and experience social disadvantages in addition to economic struggles.

When you’re raised in a poor place, it’s easy for everything else to fall into disarray. Donations help mitigate this problem by giving people what they need to survive. When you have the necessities, you can focus on self-actualization. So how does this benefit you? Donations are good for your health in more ways than one.

It’s Good for You Psychologically

Studies show that giving generously lowers cortisol levels in the brain. Cortisol is considered our “alarm system.” It’s the body’s stress hormone. While useful in some circumstances, like anything taken to excess, it can be detrimental to our mental and physical well-being. Therefore, acts of charity are so worth it. Donating helps increase self-esteem, lower stress levels, and gives you a sense of greater happiness and satisfaction. You helped another person. Recognizing that isn’t some form of an ego trip. We should commend this behavior, and you should feel good about it. Luckily, your mind agrees, and your psychological well-being increases.

It’s Good for You Physically

Donating to your local charity contributes to longevity, and it’s environmentally sound. People with altruistic personality traits—generous and most likely to give to charity—are more likely to live long lives. Altruistic people are at lower risk for heart attacks. They also have diminished brain activity in the amygdala—the fight or flight part of the brain. Charity increases levels of dopamine and oxytocin, the “feel good” chemicals in the brain, which contribute to tranquility, inner peace, and serenity.

In short, donating to charity is transformative. It helps you on a physical and psychological level. So generously practice as often as possible. We hope that you take these principles to heart.

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